Blueprint

GTM Hot Take for Mixmax.com

Here's how Mixmax.com should build out their Go-to-Market Engine

4
 min read
August 8, 2022

I'm Jordan and, in case you're new here, I often do go to market hot takes for B2B companies where I basically talk about how I would build a companies go to market engine.

We're going to get wild on this one... hold onto your butts.

What is Mixmax? Good question. I will let a screenshot do the hard work of explaining:

It's basically everything gmail.com would be if it was built for sales teams...

It's basically everything gmail.com would be if it was built for sales teams...

The goldilocks prospect for Mixmax is probably between early startups and gigantic companies. But, I wanted to be sure, so I asked Jason who their best customers were...

Jason's ideal Mixmax Customers

Jason's ideal Mixmax Customers

Mid-market companies with these titles... AEs, CSMs, and SDRs.

So we want mid-market B2B companies. Now we're going to go WAY deeper than that, but we need our basic TAM rails first.

TAM Scoring Basics

First we want to get a basic understanding of our entire Total Addressable Market (TAM).

So let's start with the basics from Harmonic.ai...

41K Companies from Harmonic TAM Pull

41K Companies from Harmonic TAM Pull

Companies that generally have more than 50 employees, but fewer than 10k, and that have raised at least $10M.

But this isn't nearly enough, not nearly enough, not nearly enough criteria to do targeting now. It's just a good ring around the market.


And only for companies that use Gmail

We can look at the MX records to know they use gmail or not, which is a basic requirement for using Mixmax.

via: https://host.io/senders.co

via: https://host.io/senders.co

This will allow us, at the domain level, to determine who we shouldn't even bother with (e.g. if they use Outlook, we should never prospect to them).

That's a solid first filter.

Now we want to qualify for their business model.

B2B v.s. B2C

We now want to rank companies by those we shouldn't sell to and those that will likely use a LOT of Mixmax.

We can use Clay (tracked link to give you 30 more free days!) to do this by pointing Google at each domain and asking who has a pricing page.

And who talks about an Enterprise offering on their pricing page.

This is one way to see which domains are B2B.

You can use Clay + Google to score B2B vs. B2C

You can use Clay + Google to score B2B vs. B2C

Count of # of Sales, Account Executives, and CSM

Mixmax charges based on seats, too.

So we want to understand how many people exist on their sales team (SDRs and AEs) and how many customer success managers (CSM) they have.

This will allow us to estimate if it's a possible $100, $1,000, or $10,000 account for Mixmax. So we know how much we can spend to try and acquire them.

This is another thing Clay can do for us...

I did "sales" here as a count of title matches, but really we'd want to do SDR, BDR, "development," and Account Executive, and AE... and CSM, etc... but this will do for demonstration purposes.

A score, per domain, to see how many folks in sales work at an org.

A score, per domain, to see how many folks in sales work at an org.

Only for companies with product market fit

PMF = Product Market Fit.

We want companies that have already found product market fit, and as backstop to figure out if they are B2B, we can look for a case studies section on their website.

Find the case studies link for companies.

Find the case studies link for companies.

Painful Moments

Now, before we continue, let's take stock. Here's what we know:

  1. All domains in our TAM
  2. Which domains use Gmail
  3. Which are B2B
  4. Which have a LOT of our ideal titles
  5. Which likely have product market fit

So we have a score of which companies can pay us the most :). Now we need to figure out what our wedge is into these accounts. Here are a few ideas.

Email setup challenges?

Do they currently have email setup challenges? This will allow us to reach out with some useful information to help them in the inbox.

So we should look through the SPF, DKIM, and DMARC records of every domain in our TAM. This will tell us a LOT about their email setup.

Mixmax checks your basic email deliverability

Mixmax checks your basic email deliverability

These DNS records are key to email deliverability and they give us a public clue to where people are at in their sales sending journey.


Clearbit's SPF records

Clearbit's SPF records

ServiceBell's SPF record

ServiceBell's SPF record

Image

Image caption

Data from mxtoolbox.com

Data from mxtoolbox.com

How many domain redirects do they have?

How many domain redirects exist on the domain? If they have a lot, they are probably sending a LOT of email. We can go recursively look at each of these domains to score them, too.

via https://host.io/senders.co

via https://host.io/senders.co

‎I didn't explore this, but you could also look at subdomains here, too. Here's another good example: https://host.io/ip/139.59.152.46

Hiring SDRs / AEs / CSMs.

Here are all the companies in my database that are hiring SDRs, AEs, and CSMs right now... as well as the tool stacks we detected for them.

Companies currently hiring for CSM, SDR, and AEs and associated tools found.

Companies currently hiring for CSM, SDR, and AEs and associated tools found.

I also looked through all jobs in my database for any of these case-sensitive keywords: 'Mixmax', 'mixmax', 'MixMax', 'Outreach', 'Salesloft', 'Lemlist', 'Groove', 'SalesLoft', 'Reply.io'‎

That way Mixmax knows who is actively hiring across the three functions they serve, making it much more likely that they are about to need to scale their outreach.‎

What's Next?

These are all just the basics, they give you some ideas of a world that's not scoring from Apollo or ZoomInfo. We have some hypotheses about how to score the TAM by things Mixmax cares about and some painful moment ideas that might mean someone needs Mixmax.

But the real work usually begins with better theories than the ones I invented. These theories usually come from Mixmax. Some examples of the jobs-to-be-done that Mixmax might look for... are around the problems they solve for their customers.

  1. Sales reps can't send email because systems are too complex
  2. Customers are upset because CSMs can't communicate quickly
  3. It's hard to schedule meetings with sales reps

These are the types of problems Mixmax should be detecting and leading with and this post is just the start of this type of work.

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